beatrice_otter: Sha're in a blue veil (Shau'ri)
For those of you who don't know, the Barna research group is a group that focuses on researching religious trends in America.  Although they are very DEFINITELY Christian and doing this for a Christian audience, they are also quite firm in their belief that in order to make good choices people need good, reliable information to base it on.  So they're pretty good about being as fair and accurate as they can in their research practices.

Their newest finding?  That in the last year, public opinion in America has swung quite dramatically in favor of immigration, diversity, and refugees, with most population segments adding at least 10% to their approval.  And practicing Christians who believe the US should welcome refugees more than doubled between 2016 and 2017, which is why there are currently more religious leaders across the board speaking to refugee and immigration issues.  (Evangelicals are the lone holdouts, surprise, surprise.)  For example, the Christian community is pretty much united in opposition to ending or limiting the DREAM program.  Even the Evangelicals agree there.

Unfortunately, the shift doesn't seem to be from racists, nationalists, and other right-wingers changing their minds.  Where the shift seems to be coming from is the people who were undecided a year ago moving towards open-mindedness, tolerance, and compassion.  So it's not that the whole country is moving towards tolerance, it's that the people in the middle are moving leftward on this issue.  Which is good, don't get me wrong!  It just means we've got our work cut out for us to reach out to the Evangelicals and the FOX newsers and all and help them see things in a different light.

(Obviously I'm not talking to people who aren't safe or wouldn't be safe if they tried to reach out, whether psychologically or physically.

Book Log

  • Sep. 20th, 2017 at 11:24 AM

Tina: The Musical

  • Sep. 17th, 2017 at 3:37 PM
scaramouche: Ruby Lewis as Scaramouche playing a Red Gibson guitar. (scaramouche hits the riffs)
What with the news of there being a Tina Turner musical coming soon, I popped in one of her CDs in to listen (and sing along to) and have decided that I should put together a guess-list for the songs that I want to make it into the musical, arranged roughly from DEFINITELY MAKING IT IN to DEFINITELY NOT MAKING IT IN.

First of all, "What's Love Got to with It" and "Proud Mary" are definitely making it in, 100% guaranteed.



Cut for length, lots of embeds. )

Mermaid watch: A Mermaid's Tale

  • Sep. 16th, 2017 at 5:44 PM
scaramouche: A mermaid from Hook swimming (mermaid - hook)
So there's a direct-to-DVD movie called A Mermaid's Tale that came out a few months ago, about a girl who befriends a mermaid, and Jerry O'Connell plays the girl's dad. The film itself is kinda embarrassing in that basic, a-minimum-amount-of-effort-was-made kind of way, but the thing that offends me the most of the entire venture is the following:

This is what the mermaid looks like. (She's the one on the right, and in this scene she has legs.) She's pretty, and pretty typical for a teenager/young woman.

Screencap behind the cut. )

This is what the mermaid looks like on the DVD cover.

DVD cover behind the cut. )

Tina

  • Sep. 15th, 2017 at 10:07 PM
scaramouche: Patina Miller as Deloris in Sister Act the Musical (sister act: deloris singing)
Jukebox musicals are a mixed bag, but when I saw that there's going to a jukebox musical based on Tina Turner's life premiering in London next year, my reaction was pretty much just YES THIS IS A THING I NEED GIVE IT TO ME NOW



My needs are easy sometimes.

Sep. 14th, 2017

  • 8:47 AM
beatrice_otter: Yuletide (Yuletide)
I know that only about 1/3 of all participants use the nomination coordinating spreadsheet, but that is making things very hard for me.  Because I would assume that Rivers of London, which has been a perennial Yuletide fandom for years, would be nominated?  Because it always is?  BUT IT IS NOT ON THE SPREADSHEET?!?  And if someone else will be nominating it, I would like to use my slots for other fandoms that pretty much won't be nominated by anyone else, BUT WHAT IF THIS IS THE YEAR FANDOM FAILS ME?!?  I wasn't in RoL fandom last year!

Here are some of the other fandoms I am considering nominating, and I need to make a decision like, NOW.

Random Harvest (1942)--classic, classic melodrama starring the ineffable Greer Garson.  Tropetastic.

Archandroid - Janelle Monae--another one that others often nom, and there hasn't been new canon for a while, but always reliable for some great worldbuilding fic.

Kitty Foyle (1940)--Ginger Rogers showing why she is an AWESOME actress.  I want the fic that covers the original ending, the one that the studio and the censors made them change: she keeps the baby and raises him out of wedlock.

Hobson's Choice (1954)--I want more of Maggie and Will!  So much more.


Here are the fandoms I would request fic in if someone else nommed them, but wouldn't take up a nomination slot for:
Lord Peter Wimsey - Dorothy Sayers--classic cozy mysteries, and I love Peter and Harriet and Bunter all together.
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress - Heinlein
My Fair Lady
Batman Beyond

And, again, Batman Beyond is pretty likely to be nommed, and so is Peter Wimsey, but NEITHER IS ON THE SPREADSHEET OMG.

I just need to figure out a) whether I can take the risk of RoL not being nominated, and b) if so whether to drop Kitty Foyle or Hobson's Choice.  (If I nom RoL, Kitty and Hobson are both gone.)

Looking at that list, I am REALLY into classic movies this year.  I guess.

ETA: There is a second spreadsheet of noms, and Rivers of London is on it.  Peter, Thomas, Varvara, Seawoll, Lesley, Stephanopoulos, and Sahra are the characters.  I have accordingly nominated Random Harvest, the Archandroid, and Hobson's Choice.

Tags:

Book Log

  • Sep. 14th, 2017 at 9:14 AM
scaramouche: Door knocker from Labyrinth (labyrinth knocker)
Julia Fox's Sister Queens: Katherine of Aragorn and Juana, Queen of Castile is a readable, straightforward biography of the sisters Juana and Katherine, daughters of the most Catholic monarchs Isabella of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragorn. As a combined biography it's fine, if a little one-sided since there's more known information about Katherine than Juana, but it did leave me wondering why it had to be a combined biography at all, and of these two specific ladies.

Like, in comparison, Nancy Goldstone's Four Queens talks about all four sisters as they were involved in marriages across Western Europe and caused intersecting points of interest, while her Catherine & Marguerite combined biography was done so to highlight the conflict between mother and daughter. Fox's book could very well have chosen to talk about all five of Isabella and Ferdinand's kids, giving a wider scope to the Spanish relationships, but she picked Juana and Katherine, who weren't that close and weren't even involved in direct conflict with each other because....?

Maybe it's to highlight their differing experiences as queens, which then turned to similarity as they suffered under the men who had power of them. There is something interesting in that -- I did like the portions pointing out that despite Juana being a queen regnant, she was treated very, absurdly differently from Katherine, who was "merely" a queen consort. But although I very much enjoyed reading about these women, I couldn't quite figure out what the book was trying to do by putting their stories side by side.

That said, the stuff I did like was the book's pushing into the forefront Juana and Katherine's upbringing under their passionate and driven parents, and how it would've influenced their choices as queen (seemingly Katherine more than Juana, which made for reading the later drama with Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn some freshness), plus its defense of Juana against her reputation as Juana the Mad. Good stuff, and only mildly perplexing.
scaramouche: Baze and Chirrut from Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (star wars - space battle husbands)
I really need to get into better habit of archiving my tumblr fics, in case they get swallowed by the tumblr langoliers.

These are a bunch of timestamps of my Rogue One fic A Single Monk in Good Standing Must be in Want of Bro arranged in chronological order, instead of posting order.

Timestamp #1: Missing scene between atelier convo and Foss Day. )

Timestamp #2: Mystery of the starbird charm. )

Timestamp #3: At the open door gathering. )

Timestamp #4: Futurefic, a moment up on the wall. )
emeraldarrows: Doctor Who - Fifth Doctor cheering while playing cricket with text "one for team doctor!" (1)
I saw a recommendation on tumblr for Daughter of the Pirate King by Tricia Levenseller and checked it out.



Summary on the back: Sent on a mission to retrieve an ancient hidden map - the key to a legendary treasure trove - seventeen-year-old pirate captain Alosa deliberately allows herself to be captured by her enemies, giving her the perfect opportunity to search their ship. More than a match for the ruthless pirate crew, Alosa has only one thing standing between her and the map: her captor, the unexpectedly clever and unfairly attractive first mate, Riden. But not to worry, for Alosa has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no lone pirate can stop the Daughter of the Pirate King.

My thoughts: This book had a slow start, and at first glance Alosa had most of the characteristics I dislike in a YA protagonist - too young, far too talented for her age, a violent, unnaturally good fighter, and annoyingly sassy - but I enjoyed the setting so I kept on reading. And before long it captured my interest. Yes, Alosa is all of the things I thought she was, and she is full of herself, but she does improve, and get layers - a tragic childhood of abuse, and a revelation as to exactly why she's so talented and unnatural - that helped change my opinion of her, and even grudgingly admit she wasn't so bad by the end. Similarly Riden starts out as relatively unlikable, but quickly grew on me, with layers of his own to uncover, and some impressive moments of self-sacrifice and honor.

The writing isn't perfect - a bit cheesy and occasionally bland - but there is some witty humor and several moments had me giggling or emotional. The darker moments don't blend well with the overall story - the writer couldn't seem to decide if she wanted a light-hearted swashbuckler or a gritty tale of a very unique girl trying to navigate a man's world - and the brief instances of torture and blood seemed entirely out of place. The real strength of the book, to me, was it's delightful concept, putting a fresh spin on the interactions of pirates and sirens. I'm actually surprised that both don't have more of a presence in YA fiction, but I'm always pleased when they appear, especially with the creativity in this plot. It was also refreshing to see a dash of the darker side of pirate and siren life, even if unpleasant - dubious consent/treatment of both women and men by the opposite gender, and violence. I did have one major issue with the way the topics were handled: while the violence/unwanted behavior of the male pirates to Alosa (and hinted at regarding other women) is rightfully and strongly condemned, the rape/murder of male sailors by female sirens is strangely romanticized as merely the way they reproduce (and one character is praised within the narrative for not trying to fight them off), which made me very uncomfortable, despite the briefness of the scene. But hopefully it's something that will addressed better in the sequel.

Despite its occasional side-eye worthy moments and imperfections, Daughter of the Pirate King was a mostly entertaining, relatively fun read that, if nothing else, left me wishing for more YA pirate books. Particularly ones with sirens.